OURCHOPIN FORUM Forum Index OURCHOPIN FORUM
CHOPIN: THE POET OF THE PIANO
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   
Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

What did Chopin teach to his students?

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    OURCHOPIN FORUM Forum Index -> Chopin as teacher
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
wanderer



Joined: 29 Sep 2006
Posts: 73

PostPosted: Sun Oct 01, 2006 1:24 pm    Post subject: What did Chopin teach to his students? Reply with quote

Anyone knows what works/exercises Chopin taught to his students? His own compositions?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
lol_nl



Joined: 18 Sep 2006
Posts: 32
Location: Ede, Netherlands

PostPosted: Wed Oct 04, 2006 8:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

He was very fond of Clementi's Gradus ad Parnassum, using it in the same way as Czerny and Hanon are used today.
Furthermore, yes, he thaught his own compositions sometimes, but also a lot of classical compositions, like Mozart's works (but probably not Beethoven's, not sure about this though) and of course Bach, like we still do.
He didn't teach them many pieces of his era. He taught Liszt very occasionally, and never taught Schumann.

That's all I know.
_________________
Yiteng

"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music." - S. Rachmaninov
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website Yahoo Messenger MSN Messenger
PJF



Joined: 19 Sep 2006
Posts: 24
Location: South Louisiana, USA

PostPosted: Sat Oct 07, 2006 10:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

He saved his Etudes for only the most advanced students. He knew the danger of technically over-extending one's self.
_________________
Outwardly Limited,
Boundless to Inward

Pete
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
MorrisseyMan



Joined: 24 Sep 2006
Posts: 16
Location: Gold Coast, Australia

PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2006 8:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

In respect to scales, he would begin teaching his students B Major (5 sharps), and would gradually go through the scales until he reached C Major (no sharps/flats), which he believed to be the most difficult. He believed that C Major was difficult because of the shape of the hand. I checked it out, and it makes sense.

For example, in C Major, the fourth is F. To reach this note using 'correct' technique, you put your thumb under. In B major, the fourth is E. The length that the thumb has to travel under the hand is slightly shorter from D# to E than from E to F. And, because the thumb is naturally 'under' the other fingers, the movement is easier because the third finger is on a black note, which are obviously higher then the white notes. The same principle is applied at the end of the B major scale, when the thumb has to move under the hand to reach B. A# to B is a shorter length then B to C, and the hand is raised on the black keys, so it makes it easier.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message MSN Messenger
enchantedpianist



Joined: 29 Sep 2006
Posts: 41
Location: Vietnam

PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2006 2:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow ! This is so interesting ! I'll tell my teacher to make me practice the running up and down with B major first. I don't know if she thinks the way Chopin did.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Yahoo Messenger
lol_nl



Joined: 18 Sep 2006
Posts: 32
Location: Ede, Netherlands

PostPosted: Sat Nov 25, 2006 7:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

He believed the movement should come from the fist, not from the arm, as thought before. His technique is said to be revolutionary. He formed the base of the thought not to over-practise.
_________________
Yiteng

"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music." - S. Rachmaninov
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website Yahoo Messenger MSN Messenger
enchantedpianist



Joined: 29 Sep 2006
Posts: 41
Location: Vietnam

PostPosted: Sun Apr 01, 2007 1:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

lol_nl wrote:
He believed the movement should come from the fist, not from the arm, as thought before. His technique is said to be revolutionary. He formed the base of the thought not to over-practise.


Yes. I remember that some great pianists say that if you practiced more than 4 hours a day, you wouldn't become a great pianist Shocked
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Yahoo Messenger
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    OURCHOPIN FORUM Forum Index -> Chopin as teacher All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1


 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group