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Does Chopin belong to "romantic"?

 
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enchantedpianist



Joined: 29 Sep 2006
Posts: 41
Location: Vietnam

PostPosted: Sun Feb 04, 2007 2:59 pm    Post subject: Does Chopin belong to "romantic"? Reply with quote

Chopin lived in the romantic era of classical music but Chopin did not consider his music "romantic" in the sense of other composers especially Schumann. What was Chopin's thought about his music? Was it classical like Mozart, or pre-romantic like Schubert? Why do people nowadays always say that Chopin's music is romantic music?
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Pianoman1992



Joined: 07 Dec 2006
Posts: 61
Location: Horsham, Pennsylvania (half an hour away from Philly)

PostPosted: Sun Feb 04, 2007 3:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Chopin is the definition of romantic!! He was one of the first composers to factor his home country into his music (mazurkas and polonaises), which is what almost every other Romantic Era composer later did. Just listening to Chopin's music, you just have a romantic feeling wash over you. Even though he didn't like to use it often, he still used rubato in his works, which allows the player to express themselves more freely, a prime example of what Romanticism is about.

As much as Chopin adored Mozart and Bach, the time he was living in was so radically different that his music just had to be too. Right now I'm listening to the Adagio sostenuto movement of the Trio in G Minor, and it is so beautiful and expressive there is absolutely no other category I could classify it in than Romanticism!
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wanderer



Joined: 29 Sep 2006
Posts: 73

PostPosted: Sun Feb 04, 2007 9:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

But why do people say that Chopin's music is not "romantic" in its true meaning? They say his music does not paint pictures, tell stories...
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Pianoman1992



Joined: 07 Dec 2006
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Location: Horsham, Pennsylvania (half an hour away from Philly)

PostPosted: Sun Feb 04, 2007 11:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Because his piece titles all followed the structure _____ in ___ Major/Minor. This is contrary to composers who did "paint pictures" like Debussy, who wrote works like The Joyous Isle, Reflections in the Water, and Gardens in the Rain.
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chopin
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Joined: 24 Jul 2003
Posts: 72
Location: Philadelphia, PA

PostPosted: Sun Mar 11, 2007 1:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pianoman1992 wrote:
Because his piece titles all followed the structure _____ in ___ Major/Minor. This is contrary to composers who did "paint pictures" like Debussy, who wrote works like The Joyous Isle, Reflections in the Water, and Gardens in the Rain.



Chopin was against all attempts to put titles into his music. For example he was not happy when the English publishing house put the title "Les murmures de la Sein" into his nocturnes op.9. Our music appreciators put more titles to make it easier for listeners to remember the work, and perhaps suggest some interpretation.
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Pianoman1992



Joined: 07 Dec 2006
Posts: 61
Location: Horsham, Pennsylvania (half an hour away from Philly)

PostPosted: Sun Mar 11, 2007 2:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Most of the time I actually like it when pieces don't have specific titles. I think that when there is a title it almost tells the listener what to think of when hearing pieces. With Chopin's format for piece titles, the piece can sound like anything to anybody. He probably felt that people should interpret them their own way, not his.
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wanderer



Joined: 29 Sep 2006
Posts: 73

PostPosted: Tue Mar 13, 2007 4:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

So, what does "romantic" mean anyway?
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baroquevn



Joined: 30 Jun 2007
Posts: 5
Location: Vietnam

PostPosted: Tue Jul 03, 2007 12:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

wanderer wrote:
But why do people say that Chopin's music is not "romantic" in its true meaning? They say his music does not paint pictures, tell stories...

For myself, I think, Chopin's music is really romantic. I mean, we will have a romantic feeling when we listen his music. I don't know how to classify, but, an example for Nocturnes op.9 No 1 in Bbm ( Les murmures de la Sein).
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nocturne



Joined: 15 Jul 2007
Posts: 26
Location: Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Sun Jul 22, 2007 9:51 pm    Post subject: Re: Does Chopin belong to "romantic"? Reply with quote

enchantedpianist wrote:
Chopin lived in the romantic era of classical music but Chopin did not consider his music "romantic" in the sense of other composers especially Schumann. What was Chopin's thought about his music? Was it classical like Mozart, or pre-romantic like Schubert? Why do people nowadays always say that Chopin's music is romantic music?


Erm...

Okay.

I have NEVER heard anyone say anything like this. Even CLOSE to this. Evil or Very Mad I mean, sure Chopin is "delicate" persay, in his music, but that does not make that "Classical" or "Pre-Romantic" in any way. First of all, his compositions are not in the time period at all [the Classical period ended at about 1825, when Chopin was only 15]. Also, there is no use of any remote form of the Classical styles [Sonata-allegro form? His sonatas are from them - more like fantastic flights of fantasy. Symphony? Divertimento? Erm, his compositions are FAR from anything structured - more like spontaneous sketches of pure emotional beauty!] Furthermore, his use of emotion in music is outstanding, far from the "restrained" Classical era. He uses stories as well in his music, but paints emotion far better, characteristic of the Romantics. What am I even saying, Chopin is NOTHING like the classical musicians, beside the fact he merely admired Mozart.

You tell I am VERY Evil or Very Mad

Why?

Because saying Chopin is even maybe classical is like saying he is devoid of character, of emotion. This is evidently NOT TRUE, okay? Chopin is so much more, so get that straight, okay? Sorry if I offended anyway, just extremely mad!

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