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Is Chopin's music kind of weak?

 
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enchantedpianist



Joined: 29 Sep 2006
Posts: 41
Location: Vietnam

PostPosted: Sun Oct 22, 2006 8:47 pm    Post subject: Is Chopin's music kind of weak? Reply with quote

I meant the unconventional structure, the sad melody, the unexpected modulation. It is totally not as academic as Bach's although Chopin said he admired Bach ?! Someone even said that Chopin's music was not chic. I am confused now Sad
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MorrisseyMan



Joined: 24 Sep 2006
Posts: 16
Location: Gold Coast, Australia

PostPosted: Mon Oct 23, 2006 9:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I believe that Chopin's music is just as strong as Bach's. He was just as intelectual about composition, only in a different way. He created his own forms, possibly because his own sense of symmetry forced him to do so. Also, the modulations were why he is remembered, and why he is known as one of the great composers. Unconventional modulations aren't the mark of a weak composer, rather, they are the mark of a strong one, as he isn't afraid to go against the convention of the last few centuries. For example, Schoenberg is still known for the twelve-tone method, which doesn't use conventional scales, but is still one of the most intellectual ways of composing ever.

And I don't believe Chopin is always sad... Just look at his F# major Impromptu, any Waltz in a major key, a few of the Nocturnes, and the prime example: the Polonaise in A flat major, op. 53.
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PJF



Joined: 19 Sep 2006
Posts: 24
Location: South Louisiana, USA

PostPosted: Tue Oct 24, 2006 5:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Chopin's waltz in E-flat (No. 1) is downright ebullient. Nothing sad there!
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lol_nl



Joined: 18 Sep 2006
Posts: 32
Location: Ede, Netherlands

PostPosted: Sat Nov 25, 2006 7:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't believe you can call them "weak". They are different and composed in another era. In the Romantic Era it was the habit of composers to compose in a style comparable to Chopin (not exactly the same of course). In Baroque the compositions were just more fixed and the composer had to compose more things according to musical laws. That doesn't make it stronger (although Bach's compositions are VERY succesful Baroque compositions and therefore maybe "stronger").
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Yiteng

"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music." - S. Rachmaninov
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chopin
Site Admin


Joined: 24 Jul 2003
Posts: 72
Location: Philadelphia, PA

PostPosted: Wed Nov 29, 2006 5:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bach and Chopin belong to different periods. Therefore the structural form in their music cannot be the same. Chopin is an innovator of piano music. His transformation of old structures and invention of new forms are amazing.
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nocturne



Joined: 15 Jul 2007
Posts: 26
Location: Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Sun Jul 22, 2007 9:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

MorrisseyMan wrote:
I believe that Chopin's music is just as strong as Bach's. He was just as intelectual about composition, only in a different way. He created his own forms, possibly because his own sense of symmetry forced him to do so. Also, the modulations were why he is remembered, and why he is known as one of the great composers. Unconventional modulations aren't the mark of a weak composer, rather, they are the mark of a strong one, as he isn't afraid to go against the convention of the last few centuries. For example, Schoenberg is still known for the twelve-tone method, which doesn't use conventional scales, but is still one of the most intellectual ways of composing ever.

And I don't believe Chopin is always sad... Just look at his F# major Impromptu, any Waltz in a major key, a few of the Nocturnes, and the prime example: the Polonaise in A flat major, op. 53.


I would agree utterly and completely. Look at his Polonaises, heroic, majestic, and patriotic. Scherzi, dark and sometimes humourous. Waltzes, refined, graceful, elegant. I could go on...Barcarolle, Tarantelle...Preludes...seriously, how could one even dare compare Chopin to something remotely "weak"? More like a spectrum of wonderful emotions, brought about by colourful harmonies and incredibly idiomatic writing.
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