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  work list 

WORKS WITHOUT OPUS : INDEXED WORKS | UNINDEXED WORKS
   WORKS WITH OPUS : 01-05 | 06-10 | 11-15 | 16-20 | 21-25
                     26-30 | 31-35 | 36-40 | 41-45 | 46-50
                     51-55 | 56-60 | 61-65 | 66-70 | 71-74 

 

Concerto op. 21

for pianoforte & orchestra in F minor, Op. 21 (Br. 43, KK. 255-267)
composed in 1829/autumn - 1830/early, published in 1836

        dedicated to Comtesse Delfina Potocka

“I, perhaps unfortunately, already have my ideal, which I have served loyally, though silently for half a year, of which I dream, and which is commemorated by the Adagio of my Concerto […].”

“Elsner praised the Concerto’s Adagio saying that it is a novelty, but I do not want anyone’s verdict on the Rondo since I am still not quite pleased with it.” - From the letters of F. Chopin to Tytus Woyciechowski in Poturzyn, Warsaw 3 and 20 October 1829.

“The first concert [17 March 1830 at the National Theatre in Warsaw], even the hall was full […], did not make the impression on the mass of the audience, as I understood. – The Allegro, accessible only to the few, won some bravos but it seems to me that it was deemed fitting to be puzzled: What is this? – and to pose as connoisseurs! – The Adagio and Rondo produced the greatest effect and more sincere shouts were heard […]. – Kurpinski found new beauties in my concerto that evening, […] and Elsner regretted that my pantaloon was dull and the bass arpeggios could not be heard. […] Mochnacki, praising me to the skies in “Kuryer Polski”, especially for the Adagio, ended by counseling more energy. – I guessed where that energy lies, so at the nest concert [22 March 1830, also at the National Theatre] I played on a Viennese piano instead of my own, […] consequently, the audience, an even larger one than before, was pleased. – Applause and compliments that I had played better the second time than the first, and that each note sounded like a little pearl […].”

“[…] I am surprised that the Adagio made such a universal impression; whether I turn, I hear only about the Adagio.” - From the letters of F. Chopin to Tytus Woyciechowski in Poturzyn, Warsaw 27 March 1830.

“You have not written yet whether […] you shall have the first [Concerto] printed; I believe that this one will certainly be well liked.” - From a letter by Mikolaj Chopin to F. Chopin in Paris, 11 April 1835.

(1) Breitkopf & Haertel published an arrangement for pianoforte solo shortly after the 1st publication.
(2) First known performance was privately in Chopin's home on 1830/3/3, with Kurpinski conducting. Public performance a fortnnight later in National Theatre, Warszawa.
(3) The work was called 'Second Concerto' on publication due to a delay in preparing the orchestral parts. In order of composition it is the first, though.
 

Grande Polonaise Brillante précédée d'un Andante Spianato op. 22

for pianoforte & orchestra in E Flat Major, Op. 22 (Br. 58, KK. 268-272)
composed in 1830/9 - 1831/7, revised in 1835, published in 1836

        dedicated to Madame F. d'Este

The Andante Spianato for pianoforte in G Major (Br. 88) was composed in 1834.

Ballade no. 1 op. 23

for pianoforte in G minor, Op. 23 (Br. 66, KK. 273-279)
composed in 1831/5-6 sketched, completed in 1835, published in 1835

        dedicated to Monsieur Le Baron de Stockausen

"I received a new ballade from Chopin. It seems to be a work closest to his genius (although not the most ingenious) and I told him that I lie it best of all his composition. After a quite lengthy silence he replied with emphasis, "I'm happy to hear this since I too like it most and hold it dearest"." - From a letter by Robert Schumann to Heinrich Dorn, Leipzig 14 Sep 1836

Mazurka op. 24, 1

for pianoforte in G minor, Op. 24, 1 (Br. 89, KK. 280-296)
composed in 1834-35, published in 1836

Mazurka op. 24, 2

for pianoforte in C Major, Op. 24, 2 (Br. 89, KK. 280-296)
composed in 1834-35, published in 1836

Mazurka op. 24, 3

for pianoforte in A Flat Major, Op. 24, 3 (Br. 89, KK. 280-296)
composed in 1834-35, published in 1836

Mazurka op. 24, 4

for pianoforte in B Flat minor, Op. 24, 4 (Br. 89, KK. 280-296)
composed in 1834-35, published in 1836

        four mazurkas dedicated to Monsieur le Comte de Perthuis

Etude op. 25, 1

for pianoforte in A Flat Major, Op. 25, 1 (Br. 104, KK. 297-344)
composed in 1836/9 early, published in 1837

"It is said that while describing the rendition of this Etude, Chopin said to one of his pupils: Please imagine a young shepherd seeking refugee in a sheltered cavern against an encroaching storm. While the distant wind and rain sough, he gently plays his melody on a pipe." - Recounted by J. Kleczynski in Chopin w celniejszych swoich utworach, Warsaw 1886

"Among them I must mention predominantly the first, more of a poem than an etude. It would be a mistake to suppose that he permitted us to hear every one of its small notes. It was rather an undulation of the A flat major chord, strengthen here and there by the pedal; but through the harmony there emerged a wonderful melody in big notes. Only in the middle section did a tenor voice break clearly from the chord and join the main melody. This etude yield an impression similar to the one made by a wonderful dream which, half awake, we would like to recapture. This is difficult to express even more so to praise with the help of words." - Schumann, vide supra

Etude op. 25, 2

for pianoforte in F minor, Op. 25, 2 (Br. 97, KK. 297-344)
composed in 1836/1, published in 1837

"He immediately passed to the second one in the facicle in F minor, also bearing the unforgettable imprint of his personality, an etude as charming, dreamy, and soft as the song of a child singing in his sleep." - Schumann, vide supra

Etude op. 25, 3

for pianoforte in F Major, Op. 25, 3 (Br. 99, KK. 297-344)
composed in 1836, published in 1837

"It was followed by the successive, beautiful etude in F major, novel not so much as regards its characters as the employed motif; its intention was more to demonstrate the charming bravura for which the master deserved the greatest praise." - Schumann, vide supra

Etude op. 25, 4

for pianoforte in A minor, Op. 25, 4 (Br. 78, KK. 297-344)
composed in 1832-34, published in 1837

Etude op. 25, 5

for pianoforte in E minor, Op. 25, 5 (Br. 78, KK. 297-344)
composed in 1832-34, published in 1837

Etude op. 25, 6

for pianoforte in G sharp minor, Op. 25, 6 (Br. 78, KK. 297-344)
composed in 1832-34, published in 1837

Etude op. 25, 7

for pianoforte in C sharp minor, Op. 25, 7 (Br. 98, KK. 297-344)
composed in 1836/early, published in 1837

Etude op. 25, 8

for pianoforte in D Flat Major, Op. 25, 8 (Br. 78, KK. 297-344)
composed in 1832-34, published in 1837

Etude op. 25, 9

for pianoforte in G Flat Major, Op. 25, 9 (Br. 78, KK. 297-344)
composed in 1832-34, published in 1837

Etude op. 25, 10

for pianoforte in B minor, Op. 25, 10 (Br. 78, KK. 297-344)
composed in 1832-34, published in 1837

Etude op. 25, 11

for pianoforte in A minor, Op. 25, 11 (Br. 83, KK. 297-344)
composed in 1834, published in 1837

"Chopin played his new etudes to the astonished residents of Leipzig at a speed of lightning." - From a letter by Mendelssohn to his sister Fanny Hensel, Leipzig 6 Oct 1835

Etude op. 25, 12

for pianoforte in C minor, Op. 25, 12 (Br. 99, KK. 297-344)
composed in 1836, published in 1837

        twelve etudes dedicated to Madame la Comtesse d'Agoult (Marie d'Agoult)

"As regards to the etudes, I heard the majority played by Chopin himself, who performed them in an extremely Chopinesque manner. Imagine an aeolian harp having all the tonalities, and an artist's hand combining them with all kinds of fantastic embellishment, but always an audible deeper tone in the bass and a softly flowing cantilena in the trebe, and you will have some idea of his playing. No wonder then that I was charmed by all those pieces which I heard him play." - Schumann Gesammette Schriften uber Musik und Musiker, Leipzig 1888 vol II

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